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A little bit about seabass

Posted on 25 August 2014 by Vincent

It has has been a little quiet around here. Work, fishing and some other boring stuff kept me from writing more. So I would like to make it up to you guys and gals by writing a little bit about bass. European Seabass to be precise.

Our target

Our target (Photo by Sander vd Wal)

My main target this summer has been Seabass. I’ve had quite a good start of the season, with the first fish caught about a month before the usual first fish. And I immediately got into good numbers. Mostly small fish, but they all count. So you don’t hear me complaining here.

But still, there was that hunger for bigger fish. You always hope to feel that sudden pull on the end of your line, followed by some heavy headshaking. Usually the sign of a big ass bass.

My biggest fish from last year. That's what I was after

My biggest fish from last year. That’s what I was after

Finally, after a lot of attempts, I got a couple of nice fish after all. Persistence pays as they say. I don’t remember all the details about the trips, but I’ll show you some decent fishporn later on in the article.

About the seabass fishing

I’ve written in previous articles a little bit about the gear and flies we use, but let me get into that a little more.

We fish in and around the port of Rotterdam. A huge industrial area. No area for wussies. Most spots are hard to reach, and even harder to find. Slipping, sliding and tearing waders around the rocks might not be everyone’s cup of tea. But once you’ve felt the power and seen the beauty of a Seabass, you are immediately hooked.

The gear we use is pretty simple. An 8 or 9 weight rod, decent saltwater reel, and a Di3, Di5 or Di7 line (the number stand for the inches the line sinks per second). The line we choose all depends on the spot, the depth, the tide and the current. Tippetmaterial consists of 20-25lbs fluorocarbon. You definitely need this heavy line and the abrasion resistance quality of fluorocarbon, because of all the rocks, mussels, oysters etc. Seabass are smart fish, and you wouldn’t be the first one to lose a big fish one an oyster reef. We’ve all been there at least once.

Flies are simple. We use EP-streamers (watch this video for instructions) in the 8 to 15cm range. Natural colors are our favorite, but sometimes black/purple or chartreuse/white can also work well. Especially in dark or colored water. Some people prefer clousers, deceivers or other saltwater baitfish patterns. I think it’s just a matter of personal preference. We’ve been pretty successful with EP-streamers, but some buddies of mine prefer other flies.

The tide is also something to keep an eye on. Some spots are only accessible on a low tide. Other spots are especially productive during heavy tidal currents. Other spots are good on a high tide. So, just go fishing, and find out where to go on a certain tide.

The fishporn

Now, onto the fishporn. I’ve selected some pictures from a couple of our last trips. A little disclaimer here: Some pictures are pretty heavily photoshopped. I don’t like messing around with the pictures too much, but the port of Rotterdam is a popular fishing destination, and we’d like to keep some spots to ourselves. It’s pretty darn easy to ruin a good fishing spot by posting it on the internet. So, I’m sorry if you see some ghosting, repeating patterns etc in the background.

One of the first bass of the season. Lots of small fish

One of the first bass of the season. Lots of small fish

More small bass, this one took a shrimp pattern

More small bass, this one took a shrimp pattern

Fishing deep, using a clouser here, sometimes you hook something on the bottom you didn't expect

Fishing deep, using a clouser here, sometimes you hook something on the bottom you didn’t expect

More small bass. Hungry little fellows.

More small bass. Hungry little fellows.

We brought Sjouke into his first ever seabass this season

We brought Sjouke into his first seabass ever this season

Also, Patrick caught his first seabass ever. First of many!

Also, Patrick caught his first seabass ever. First of many!

Also Jasper got his first ever seabass. This stuff is addicting!

Also Jasper got his first ever seabass. This stuff is addicting!

One more for Patrick

One more for Patrick

Even some 50+ cm fish, nice one for Patrick here

Even some 50+ cm fish, nice one for Patrick here

Ricardo also got into fish again this season. Another 50+ fish

Ricardo also got into fish again this season. Another 50+ fish

We even managed to find some time to visit Lake Oostvoorne in between tides. The rainbows where hungry again! (photo by Sander vd Wal)

We even managed to find some time to visit Lake Oostvoorne in between tides. The rainbows where hungry again! (Photo by Sander vd Wal)

It's not just seabass that you'll encounter during seabass fishing. A big fat seatrout took Sander's sandeel pattern! A real hog!

It’s not just seabass that you’ll encounter during seabass fishing. A big fat seatrout took Sander’s sandeel pattern! A real 69cm hog!

I also landed my first mullet on fly. Hooked a couple before, had some mullet follow my fly, but never landed one. (photo by Brian Elward)

I also landed my first mullet on fly. Hooked a couple before, had some mullet follow my fly, but never landed one. (Photo by Brian Elward)

Another small one

Another small one

Push him into the lens... A little bit more... A little more... Yeah! Monster!!

Push him into the lens… A little bit more… A little more… Yeah! Monster!!

A 50-ish cm fish (Photo by Ricardo)

A 45-ish cm fish (Photo by Ricardo)

Another nice 50+cm bass (Photo by Sander vd Wal)

Another nice 50cm bass (Photo by Sander vd Wal)

Sander with a nice 55+cm bass

Sander with a nice 55-60 cm bass

Finally, a good one! 64cm's of seabass power! Took the fly in the strong tidal current. Pretty strong fighting fish! Special thanks to Sander vd Wal for taking the picture during a seabass feeding frenzy.

Finally, a good one! 64cm’s of seabass power! Took the fly in the strong tidal current. Pretty strong fighting fish! Special thanks to Sander vd Wal for taking the picture during a seabass feeding frenzy.

Great shot by Sander vd Wal of the same bass. Going back to where it belongs, grow baby, grow!

Great shot by Sander vd Wal of the same bass. Going back to where it belongs, grow baby, grow!

2 Responses to A little bit about seabass

  1. on 29 November 2015 at 13:19 Marco de São Vicente said:

    Congratz on the Blog

    Nice experience published, would be nice to see some more effective patterns for bass.
    Please contact me by email, I would like to ask you some advice related to a personal project.

    Kind regards
    Marco

  2. on 9 January 2016 at 18:14 Brian said:

    Nice write up. I fly fish for sea bass locally and have also found success with cats whiskers. Coming to try OVM in a few weeks. Looking forward to it. Greetings from Scotland

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